Dumped goods prompt community reminder

GAWLER Community House Op Shop volunteers were disappointed to arrive at work on Monday morning to find rain-damaged goods, which they weren’t able to accept, dumped at their doorstep.

Charity organisations often face the challenge of having large, difficult-to-handle and unsellable hard waste items being donated to them, but Gawler Community House volunteer co-ordinator Colleen Moyne said the issue had been  improving in recent months.

“In recent years it was happening very regularly – in fact, quite often,” Ms Moyne said.

“We’d come in on a Monday morning and, perhaps, someone had had a garage sale on the weekend and not sold everything  and dumped all their leftovers at our front door.

“But, I have to admit, the problem has not been very significant recently, and that’s why, coming in today and seeing it, it felt like, ‘oh, it’s back again’ – because it seemed like people were getting the message.”

With the heavy rainstorms that occurred over the weekend, she said the latest dumping of items was extra difficult to handle and put up for sale.

“It wasn’t even an easy task dragging that (mattress) through to the building,” Ms Moyne said.

“It was soggy and so it was extra  heavy, so we needed a few of us to drag it.”

Ms Moyne reiterated the large amount of time and effort it takes volunteers to strip mattresses, in particular, of their fabric and metal – which need to be removed separately to be sold off – along with the $65 expense to purchase a  skip to dump their frames at a depot.

While Ms Moyne appreciated community members’ generosity in donating items, she once again issued a reminder to donate mindfully.

She added that people should place clothing and bagged-up small items in the donation bin, where possible, and only bring larger goods to Community House’s donation collection area during opening hours.

“If you must leave them out the front, please make sure they are well-packaged and sheltered from the weather,” she said.

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Matteo Gagliardi joined The Bunyip in August 2016 with almost two years experience in regional print media, having previously worked at a community newspaper in Swan Hill, Victoria. Covering politics, local government and crime, Matteo likes to sink his teeth into hard-hitting issues, but also enjoys spending time getting to know the Gawler community. Matteo also has a passion for science, agriculture and the environment, and has previously worked as a media officer at the Australian Science Media Centre.

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