In my opinion…

FIERCE DEBATE HAS ERUPTED AFTER WOOLWORTHS AND COLES OUTLETS STARTED STOCKING HOT CROSS BUNS JUST A DAY AFTER CHRISTMAS, AND MORE THAN 100 DAYS OUT FROM EASTER. BUNYIP JOURNALIST LAURA TILLEY EXPLAINS WHY BOXING DAY IS TOO SOON TO SELL THESE FESTIVE TREATS.

GROWING up as a child, I was taught to cherish the small things, to slow down and savour each moment.

My parents emphasised the value of appreciating the experience at hand, before rushing ahead to the next thing.

So, with a belly full of rich, festive treats and quality time spent with family and friends, my heart was filled with thankfulness as I basked in the spirit of Christmas.

But just a day after I stuffed myself silly with ham and seafood, Woolworths outlets began rolling out hot cross buns – more than 100 days out from Easter.

There’s just something a bit sad about it.

Don’t get me wrong, I love a delicious raisin-filled treat, but these buns are more than food – they’re important symbols that mark the special holidays on our calendars.

Traditionally, hot cross buns are eaten on Good Friday, but, these days, buns are in shops as soon as the Christmas stock is marked down.

Rolling out hot cross buns year-round is killing the excitement and magic of these special holidays.

What’s more concerning, is we’re the ones choosing to feed the supermarkets’ drive for sales and money, being a nation sucked
into this consumerist, ‘must-have’ frenzy.

While there’s no denying the supermarkets have a role to play, it’s unlikely they would sell hot cross buns at Christmas time if the demand wasn’t there.

In fact, many shoppers thanked the supermarket giants, via social media, for getting a head start on the next festive season.
As far as I’m concerned, it’s like opening your Christmas presents early, or celebrating your birthday weeks before – it’s just not right.

Let’s savour the moment at hand, before rushing ahead to the next thing.

Laura Tilley

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Laura Tilley joined The Bunyip team after completing her Bachelor of Journalism at the University of South Australia and working at sister newspaper The Murray Pioneer, Renmark, recently. Laura undertook a student exchange to the UK, where she studied journalism courses at the University of Worcester. She completed several stints across different media outlets where she found her passion for journalism.

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